Twenty years later, Eji Ouro still shines like morning dew — Guardian Life — Guardian Nigeria News – Nigeria and world news

Twenty years later, Eji Ouro still shines like morning dew — Lifestyle — Headline News – Nigeria and world news


Twenty years after releasing what he calls Love Tune, Sola Allison remains one of the few Nigerian artists who continues to remain consistent and evolve across genres. In fact, as she jokingly said, aside from her signature headdress, age, and forehead, Allison has evolved from a backup singer to a full-fledged artist. sky…

Twenty years after releasing what he calls Love Tune, Sola Allison remains one of the few Nigerian artists who continues to remain consistent and evolve across genres.

In fact, as she jokingly said, aside from her signature headdress, age, and forehead, Allison has evolved from a backup singer to a full-fledged artist.

Sola began his career as a backup singer in the late 1980s when he was just 13 years old. He then became a professional singer and performed with musicians such as Yinka Ayefele, Gbenga Adeboye, Pasuma, Obesele, Daddy Shawky and others. The opportunity for her to make her first album ‘Eji Owuro’ came to her when she was on a public bus when she met a man with a movie script. The man struck up a conversation with Alison, telling her about the movie he had just finished, “Orekerewa.”

Eventually she was called to sing the film’s soundtrack, resulting in the film’s title being changed to ‘Eji Owuro’. She said: “After the movie Eji Ouro was released, Ola Ibironke, the executive producer of the movie, thought that the song could stand on its own, so we needed to make it longer by adding more songs. did” “

The album was a huge commercial and critical success upon its release and launched her into the music industry.

The songstress said: “With all my humility, I can say that the sound and melodic structure of ‘Eji Ouro’ did not exist before this song was created. It is this song that put me in people’s heads. .”
She was asked what’s next in her music career?
she said: “I don’t put pressure on myself. I just accept what they come. Everything I’m going to do is based on the same foundation, the same values ​​that I’ve built, but with the power Our relationship may be a little different, but I’m still going to be the same Shola Allison.”
When asked to define her musical genre, she replied: So if you want to categorize, I would say I’m a spiritual singer. I always say I’m a singer. It’s strange to society that an artist can do music without being vulgar. Before I came here, artists were either gospel or secular singers. As for me, I’m a child of God and a Christian, but I know that the spirit of Jesus is spread everywhere, it’s not limited to the church, that’s what I This is my understanding. Spirituality is not limited to religion. Jesus did not come just for Christians. Jesus came for the whole world. Jesus is not limited to the four walls of the church. What matters is the souls that my music touches and changes. ”

Speaking about the collaboration, the Ikorodu-born singer said: “I collaborated with Adekunle Gold because our style of expression is similar and he was perfect for the message I wanted to convey.” Most recently, he collaborated with Sunmisola Agbebi. I don’t intend to collaborate with anyone for commercial reasons. I want to make money, but I’m not going to collaborate with someone just for commercial reasons. I work with people based on their understanding or understanding of my destiny and my purpose, but I am open to working together. ”

Allison’s previous songs include 2003’s “Eji Owuro”, 2005’s “Gbeje Fori”, 2007’s “Ire”, 2009’s “Imore”, 2011’s “Adun”, “Ope” ( (2015), “Imuse” (2018), “Iri” (2019), “Isodotun” (2021), and “Imisi” in 2022. All of these songs confirmed her status as a Midas-like artist. And despite the pressure, the 52-year-old songstress persisted in using Yoruba.
Her smooth voice is captivating and she has collaborated with over five artists since the beginning of her career.

Is she going to sing in English?
“Would you like to sing in English?” she asks.
“I doubt that,” she laughed. “There are a lot of young people who are under pressure because they want to sound a certain way. Everyone has a part of the industry that they’re sent to. No one can be sent to everyone. Not.”
She continued: “There are people your work will never reach. In my case, I’m okay because I’ve found the people I want to work with. I want my music to work to make a difference in the minds, hearts, and souls of people’s lives.” As long as I’m fine.”

she said: But I’m grateful. Her life is lived every day. I’ve been getting feedback about the impact my music has had on people, which has made them take me more seriously. I just wanted to express myself, but when I began to see the impact my actions had on people’s souls, God used that to open my eyes to how serious my mission was. He let me. I’ve always been a serious person, but I’ve become more serious. I still have a long way to go, but I am grateful for where I am. And I am confident that it will continue to evolve until I die. The only thing that hasn’t changed apart from the amount. My Gele has evolved. I’m grateful for where I am. I’m not an entertainer. I’m a singer. ”

Source: guardian.ng

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *