Nollywood veterans advocate structural improvements to Nollywood Global Circuit | Guardian Nigeria News

Nollywood veterans advocate structural improvements to Nollywood Global Circuit | Headline News



Nollywood veterans and other stakeholders in the film industry say the Nigerian film industry should be celebrated for its uniqueness in storytelling, talent and production conditions, and that better structures should be put in place. are doing. In front of an audience of 74 Nollywood insiders and others from Africa, the UK and beyond…

Nollywood veterans and other stakeholders in the film industry say the Nigerian film industry should be celebrated for its uniqueness in storytelling, talent and production conditions, and that better structures should be put in place. are doing.

In front of an audience of 74 Nollywood professionals from Africa, the UK and the US, Ucheyamele Nkwam Uwaoma and Rejoice Abutusa from Bournemouth University and Cornell University respectively spoke about the origins of the film industry and its global significance. We explored fundamental questions about This exploration will be followed by the “Nollywood Global Circuit” which featured notable Nollywood veterans such as Taiwo Ajayi-Lysette, Chris Obi Lapu, Richard Mofe-Damijo (RMD) and Emem Isong who shared their concerns about the industry. It was held in a virtual panel session titled “.

Bournemouth University film production academics Dr Samantha Iwolowo and Dr Sylvia Ruseff set the stage for the conversation with their opening remarks. Notably, Ruzef outlined her fourfold understanding of Nollywood, including Hollywood, European art films, decolonization, and indigenous filmmaking.

“From my point of view, the issue was the positioning of Nollywood films. So the conversation was about looking at Nollywood completely correctly as a film, and not comparing it to other films, but valuing its uniqueness in terms of storytelling. What struck me was that the conversation started with a request to be seen as a person, “talent and production situation,” she said.

Mofe-Damijo noted that Nollywood has always been evaluated through a Western lens, noting that its global status is also due to the hard work of its practitioners, pushing creative boundaries and telling authentic stories. He claimed that it was given to him.

“The fact that some Europeans’ definition of what a film is is not particularly adapted to the way films are made in Nollywood does not diminish our work in any way,” he said.

RMD expressed satisfaction that Nollywood does not conform to European or American aesthetics. “What we’ve done is to be as global as possible, using the democratization of space through technology to compete with a filmmaking culture where budget is probably the most important thing. Whereas for us, it’s It’s about telling a story, no matter how limited your budget is or how big your budget is, and that’s what we demonstrated with ‘Black Book.’

Isong emphasized that great strides have been made with diverse voices and representation in the industry today. Although she thought comparisons between Hollywood and Nollywood were unfair, she acknowledged Nollywood’s efforts and suggested there is room for improvement.

Veteran actress Ajayi-Lysette has tasked Nollywood with the need to form a union to bring certain structures in place. She advocated giving actors management skills to avoid social media controversies that often lead to ridicule. Mr. Ajay Reset passionately appealed for the industry to be recognized as a vital force for economic and national development. In addition, she criticized the extravagant lifestyle of young actresses and encouraged a shift towards investing in education rather than aesthetics.

The highlight of the session was Mr Rapu’s proposal to change the name of Nollywood to ‘Naija Cinema’, stressing that the current name has been the subject of ridicule among academics.

“We are proposing to change the name to something that reflects our identity, such as Naija Cinema. Nollywood became a national cinema after leading national cinemas in the United States, France and the United Kingdom. Nollywood has surpassed that and is now watched by nearly 1 billion people around the world every day.”

But Rapu’s fellow panelists are unconcerned about the name, as long as the industry’s efforts speak for themselves.

As practitioners discussed remuneration, Mr. Ison emphasized the livelihood of many people, and Mr. Mofe Damijo emphasized the fulfillment that comes from passion rather than remuneration. Mofe-Damijo, who has appeared in many of her Netflix productions, dispelled her claims that the streaming platform dictates storytelling and encouraged a generational shift in the industry and an embrace of its independence.

This is because Nollywood, through its first film Living in Bondage, “persistently unravels, consciously or unconsciously, the meaning of hegemonic budgets in filmmaking, and thereby , we took full advantage of affordances such as human resources, the power of community consciousness in African societies that can be expressed as Ubuntu, the tenacity of youth and topical subject matter.”

As the veterans argued, how this movement continues to shape the industry’s global outlook in the future depends on the industry’s commitment to putting the right structures in place.

Source: guardian.ng

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *