Banksy's true identity revealed in unearthed 2003 interview — Guardian Life — Guardian Nigeria News – Nigeria and world news


Written by Lifestyle

November 23, 2023 | 11am

In a surprising turn of events, elusive street artist Banksy appears to have revealed his first name in a recently unearthed 2003 interview shared by the BBC. The artist, known for maintaining anonymity throughout his career, spoke to former BBC arts correspondent Nigel Wrench on BBC Radio 4’s PM programme. meanwhile…

In a surprising turn of events, elusive street artist Banksy appears to have revealed his first name in a recently unearthed 2003 interview shared by the BBC.

The artist, known for maintaining anonymity throughout his career, spoke to former BBC arts correspondent Nigel Wrench on BBC Radio 4’s PM programme.

During the interview, currently available on BBC Sounds as ‘The Banksy Story’, the artist was working on his show ‘Turf War’ in East London. Wrench asked Banksy about the anti-authority nature of his work, a theme that still permeates his art today.

In a notable moment, Banksy appeared to confirm his name when Wrench asked, “Can I use your name?” So that’s what happened to the Independent. ” Banksy replied, “Yes.”

The journalist continued, “Robert Banks?” To which Banksy replied, “It’s Robbie.” Mr. Wrench clarified: got it. lobby. ”

Banksy’s true identity has been the subject of speculation for years. One name associated with the artist is Robin Gunningham, who was recently named as the first defendant in a lawsuit accusing Banksy and his company Pest Control Limited of defamation.

There had previously been speculation that Robert Del Naja, known as 3D from Massive Attack, was Banksy. Both artists began their careers as graffiti artists and acknowledged the similarities in their work, claiming to be different individuals and friends.

Banksy’s career began as a graffiti artist in Bristol. His show ‘Turf War’, first held in the UK in 2003, played a pivotal role in establishing his reputation in the British art scene. The exhibition’s location was revealed just one day before it opened, adding to Banksy’s trademark mystique.

The show featured graffitied police vans, unconventional images of Winston Churchill and the Queen, and live livestock adorned with the Metropolitan Police’s signature blue plaid pattern.

In a 2003 interview with the BBC, Banksy emphasized his preference for street art and expressed disinterest in the contemporary art establishment. He said: “I think it’s better to treat the city like a big playground, right?…It’s meant to be fucked up, right?”

As this historic interview surfaces, it adds a new layer to the mystery surrounding Banksy, offering a glimpse into the artist’s thoughts and attitudes at a pivotal moment in his career.

Source: guardian.ng

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *